The Politics of Solar Rhythms: Cosmic Levitation
The Politics of Solar Rhythms: Cosmic Levitation, 2018. Projection single channel black and white video, 2:50 min. Sound frequencies, porous chondrite, charged polymers speakers, projector. Sound via temperature differentials inside and outside the exhibition space.

The Politics of Solar Rhythms: Cosmic Levitation, 2018. Projection single channel black and white video, 2:50 min. Sound frequencies, porous chondrite, charged polymers speakers, projector. Sound via temperature differentials inside and outside the exhibition space.

In the projection The politics of solar rhythms: Cosmic Levitation, particles of cosmic dust aggregate to the vibrational rhythms of sound frequencies, as part of an experiment proposed by Tomás Saraceno and conducted with the Jaeger Lab at the University of Chicago. Acoustic levitation is used in physics as a method for suspending matter in a medium, in this case air, by using intense sound waves and observing how matter aggregates when floating to their vibrations. Until now, this dynamic remains unexplored for meteorite particles, though it would be an important step towards a better understanding of the formation of planets, growing from aggregating clouds of interstellar dust. The Russian interdisciplinary scientist Alexander Chizhevsky believed that every 11 years, at the beginning of each new solar cycle, major historical events occur. His thought was that, since changes in the Sun’s activity and appearance have an effect in space, the atmosphere, and the Earth’s surface, then we, as terrestrial organisms, are not exempt from these effects.

 

He gathered a large amount of data, observing a historic correlation between higher levels of solar activity and mass revolutionary movements. This idea may also apply at a smaller scale, where temperature is defined as a measure of average molecular motion: the greater the heat, the greater the motion.What you hear is a live-stream sonification of the differential of temperature between the inside and the outside of the exhibition space: as the interior gets hot and the outside gets cooler the soundtrack changes. If the Sun might influence the rise of revolutionary movements, one might wonder how the soundwaves of temperature differentials and the ones of uprisings and revolutions on Earth might, in turn, shape cosmic dust assemblages in other galaxies, influencing the formation of the planets themselves.